Urban Planning

Introduction

This project focuses on The Brightline Initiative’s Guiding Principles #3 described as “Dedicate and mobilize the right resources.” This guiding principle discusses the need to provide the right opportunities and resources for the right people. As a result, your project can tackle head-on the challenges that lay ahead. If you are looking for evidence and examples on how to bridge the gap between strategy and implementation, especially in urban planning, then this project by The University of Tokyo and Brightline is the project to follow. Cases studies are conducted in Japan as examples where the socio-technical complexity is often high. We hope these examples can be an inspiration for the implementation of your own projects.

 

Research Projects

1. Achieving disaster preparedness with urban agriculture in cities: model-based strategy to meet dietary nutrients needs during post-disaster situations in Tokyo, Japan



2018 MIT SDM Conference
SIOEN Giles Bruno
Achieving disaster preparedness with urban agriculture in cities:
model-based strategy to meet dietary nutrients needs during post-disaster situations in Tokyo, Japan

Abstract

Tokyo, a city with a population over 12 million people, has the highest earthquake exposure in the world, posing a significant risk to its population. In the past, large earthquakes have whipped away large sections of the city. Research during similar disasters around the world showed the population in these areas lacked dietary nutrients, despite being provided with emergency food. A systems approach was adopted, which called for the identification of all the stakeholders currently involved and with a certain potential to contribute to bridge the gap. Next, the function and form model is designed and finally, a roadmap for implementation is developed based on the best-case scenarios. While Japan, and the city of Tokyo, has a strategy in place to increase the resilience of the population, the implementation is not sufficient. Improving alignment with the overall strategy to provide dietary nutrients is needed.

Proposal

This project focuses on the need to allocate the right opportunities and resources to the right people. In recovery plans around the world, people have to rely on emergency food provided from external sources. Recent studies; however, showed that emergency food is causing dependency and health issues because they mainly contain carbohydrates. Conducting a systems analysis, it is shown that there is already a potentially valuable source of nutrients present in the city that can fill this gap. Namely, in the case of Tokyo, there is a large number of agricultural lands. Therefore, this research investigated the systems architecture that can connect the produce from urban farmers to evacuees in case of emergencies. This means that, expanding the boundary of people you work with, can lead to a better implementation of the strategy in line with the needs of the stakeholders.

Outcomes

  • Presentation: Potential food supply in case of emergency with urban agriculture – Spatial analysis of Tokyo, A Seminar on Urban Disaster Recovery: Prospects for the Future Tokyo Great Earthquake from the Experiences of Christchurch, University of Tsukuba, July 6th, 2018
  • Sioen, G. B. The potential food supply in case of emergency with urban agriculture – Spatial analysis of Tokyo, A Seminar on Urban Disaster Recovery: Prospects for the Future Tokyo Great Earthquake from the Experiences of Christchurch, University of Tsukuba, July 6th, 2018
  • Sioen, G.B. (2018) The effects of land use changes seen from history, City Planning Review [Toshi Keikaku]. (In Japanese)
  • Sioen, G. B., Hiekata, K. (In press) Achieving disaster preparedness with urban agriculture in cities – A model-based strategy to meet dietary nutrients needs during post-disaster situations in Tokyo, Japan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology System Design & Management: Characterizing The Gap, conference proceeding.

 

2. An SVN model-based approach to assessing the gap between strategy and implementation – Case of Kashiwa-no-ha Smart City


 

2018 MIT SDM Conference
SIOEN Giles Bruno
An SVN model-based approach to assessing the gap between strategy and implementation
– Case of Kashiwa-no-ha Smart City.

Abstract

This study show that the needs of people must be understood to ensure successful implementation of technologies in smart cities, which calls for a need to include more social aspects in decision making. The present study aims to ensure successful implementation of technologies in smart cities by improving stakeholder collaborations. Kashiwa-no-ha Smart City, serves as a case study because of its design under a public-private-academic partnership. Results showed a lack of feedback loops from beneficiaries to decision makers resulting in poor adoption rates of smart technology (e.g. shared electrical vehicles).

Proposal

In recent years, transdisciplinary approaches, which empower service users to be involved in decision-making processes, have been presented as a means to avoid such problems. Therefore, the utilization of a transdisciplinary approach to improve feedback processes from beneficiaries to service providers is proposed. All in all, this improvement in the SVN has the potential to ensure better implementation of the smart city strategy.

Outcomes

  • Sioen, G.B, Wang, Y., Dhondt, M., Hiekata K., Onuki M. Mino. T. (In press) Framing Kashiwa-no-ha smart city through a Stakeholder Value Network, Massachusetts Institute of Technology System Design & Management: Characterizing The Gap, conference proceeding

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